The How and Why of Power Over Ethernet

An image showing a PoE connectionPower over Ethernet (PoE) is a new but rapidly growing technology. It is being progressively adopted by those in need. This technology is mainly used to power up security cameras and other gadgets that require minimal electricity. But, we expect that you already know that and want to jump right into the how and the why of power over ethernet.

This is what we have explained in this article, so keep reading.

Why Use PoE?

Here are some of the reasons as to why Power over Ethernet cables are a better option:

  • PoE saves a lot of time and cost by eliminating the expense of buying separate power cables and then installing them separately too.
  • Since you don’t need any kind of power link (except from the PoE cables), it becomes a lot easier to reposition the device (for example, an IP camera).
  • PoE is also safer than traditional ethernet cables. This is because they are designed to withstand overload or incorrect installation. Even if these cables are underpowered, nothing will happen to them.
  • Unlike traditional power cables, PoE cables are powered by a central source. You can easily control the device through it (such as resetting or disabling them) and can power these cables through a UPS, too.
  • Of course, when you have an ethernet cable that provides power to the device, network installation and distribution becomes easier and a lot more effective.

How PoE Works

Power over Ethernet cables are injected with another cable which allows an efficient power transfer, between 44 and 57 DC volts. Professional PoE installation firms ensure that the devices are compatible with Power over Ethernet technology otherwise, it can damage the devices.

Ensuring the devices for compatibility is known as signature detection phase. POE cables provide a power class of 4 and require a device that can hone similar power. In simple terms, a good Power over Ethernet service can provide up to 25.5 watts of power to devices, which is ideal for IP cameras, security doors, and other similar devices.

After the detection phase is completed, and the new device is considered compatible, a 48V supply is connected with the equipment that is to be used. This is to keep an eye out for electrical current, i.e. the PSE (power sourcing equipment) and the PD (powered device). PSE cuts the power coming from the PoE cable(s) if it lacks the required current or overpowers the PD, which ensures that the device remains safe.

Conclusion

Although it’s a lot more complicated than what we have mentioned above, but in summary, this is the answer to the how and why of Power over Ethernet. If you have any other inquiry related to this technology, feel free to contact us, and we’d be happy to help.

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